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Monday, April 26, 2010

Accessibility / Customization / Personalization

NOTE: This is content from the web re:Brand posts going back to November 2010. We have kept the re:Brand posts as a legacy archive but, on a go forward basis as of October, 2011, the new DATA eh? content takes over this space.


This is segmented part 6 of the Lucky 7 ... the major areas we intend to address for improving toronto.ca.

Our testing indicates 30% of respondents chose “Accessibility” (e.g. text size, captioning, and screen reader use) the most important factors that could improve how people access information and services on the City of Toronto website.

32% of respondents chose “Non-English language options” the most important factors that could improve how people access information and services on the City of Toronto website.

37% of respondents chose “Customization Features” (e.g. logging in, setting preferences, user profiles) as the most important factors that could improve how people access information and services on the City of Toronto website.

Some user comments:
“The City's web site needs to increase its accessibility features for residents with special needs and needs to increase the options for people who do not speak English.”
“I believe strongly that every single page fails W3C validation, sometimes multiple times due to simple errors such as a lack of ALT image tags, no Document Type descriptions… Unacceptable for a government website to have this many W3C Accessibility errors in 2007.”
“There's really no reason that most of the documents published as PDFs and can't be published as plain HTML files with an option to produce a PDF for printing if necessary.”
“e-mail notification of events, activities etc based on preferences.”
This ties into sorting out full compliance with W3c standards, providing more translations, offering the ability to get updates,delivering more choices and options.

Tell us what you think  ...

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17/2010

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Please consider a turn-key application, such as: www.essentialaccessibility.com to make your website more accessible. For more information, see: http://diversityinc.com/content/1757/article/6095/

Regards,

Ryan

Pat said...

Depending on how social and participatory a site we're allowed to have, would it be possible to consider integration of services that would allow for simple login? Ideally, I'm thinking a service like Gigya, and even just Facebook Connect would be a major way to lower the barriers to account creation and participation. Would love to know whether this is doable :)